Australian Culture / Cinema / Language in Society

Beyond Words : Non Verbal Communication in Samson and Delilah

One of the most puzzling elements in Thornton’s movie is the almost complete nonexistence of dialogue. Still, the absence of spoken words is counterbalanced by the use of a wide range of other means of communication, such as gestures, actions, gazes and sign language; an alternative range of communication means very popular in Aboriginal culture. … Continue reading

More than Just a Haircut: Aboriginal Mourning Rituals in <i>Samson and Delilah</i>
Australian Culture / Cinema

More than Just a Haircut: Aboriginal Mourning Rituals in Samson and Delilah

Setting an atypical love story between two adolescents in a modern Aboriginal community, the multi-award winning Australian movie gives a special insight into this people’s traditional behaviour and ceremonies. In particular, when death suddenly occurs in the lives of the protagonists, the presence of some of their long-standing customs subtly reveals itself, challenging the audience’s … Continue reading

One of the Best Love Stories Cinema Has Offered Us – and No, Richard Curtis Did Not Have His Finger in the Pie
Australian Culture / Cinema

One of the Best Love Stories Cinema Has Offered Us – and No, Richard Curtis Did Not Have His Finger in the Pie

With Samson and Delilah, Warwick Thornton has created a slow-paced romance that shows the blossoming relationship of a young Aboriginal couple and at the same time, quite plainly, the hardships that many of Australia’s indigenous people have to undergo. Samson and Delilah is probably one of the least passionate romances that has ever been shot –  … Continue reading

The body says more than words: Warwick Thornton’s Samson & Delilah
Australian Culture / Cinema

The body says more than words: Warwick Thornton’s Samson & Delilah

When it hit the screens in 2009, Warwick Thornton’s first full-length’s Samson & Delilah had already won the Camera d’or at Cannes and was already turning heads. And what everyone was talking about, was, precisely, the lack of dialogue in this “real Aboriginal movie”. As we discovered it’s not that Thornton doesn’t like chatting, but … Continue reading